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Books Received
July 2014

Listed below are books received for review over the last two months. Entries include publishing information as well as a description of the book. Unless otherwise stated, the book description is taken from the publisher's website or the book jacket. Selected titles from this list will be chosen for a full review in forthcoming issues of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books. Previous books received are available from the links below.

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Anti-Bribery Laws in Common Law Jurisdictions, by Stuart H. Deming. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 496p.

Anti-Bribery Laws in Common Law Jurisdictions provides a comprehensive analysis of the foreign bribery laws and of related laws and regulations in key common law jurisdictions. This book extensively addresses the official guidance associated with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and the UK Bribery Act, and explains the related legal obligations that apply to record-keeping practices and maintaining adequate internal controls. Foreign bribery legislation in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, and South Africa are also extensively addressed.

Stuart H. Deming also closely focuses on laws that may expose an individual or entity to private or commercial bribery in foreign settings, as well as to the application of laws relating to money laundering, accounting, and record-keeping practices to situations involving foreign bribery. Throughout, special attention is given to explaining the criteria used in each jurisdiction to establish liability on the part of an entity or organization for foreign bribery.” From Publisher’s website.

Arresting Citizenship: The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control, by Amy E. Lerman and Vesla M. Weaver. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. 312p.

“The numbers are staggering: One-third of America’s adult population has passed through the criminal justice system and now has a criminal record. Many more were never convicted, but are nonetheless subject to surveillance by the state. Never before has the American government maintained so vast a network of institutions dedicated solely to the control and confinement of its citizens.

A provocative assessment of the contemporary carceral state for American democracy, Arresting Citizenship argues that the broad reach of the criminal justice system has fundamentally recast the relation between citizen and state, resulting in a sizable—and growing—group of second-class citizens. From police stops to court cases and incarceration, at each stage of the criminal justice system individuals belonging to this disempowered group come to experience a state-within-a-state that reflects few of the country’s core democratic values. Through scores of interviews, along with analyses of survey data, Amy E. Lerman and Vesla M. Weaver show how this contact with police, courts, and prisons decreases faith in the capacity of American political institutions to respond to citizens’ concerns and diminishes the sense of full and equal citizenship—even for those who have not been found guilty of any crime. The effects of this increasingly frequent contact with the criminal justice system are wide-ranging—and pernicious—and Lerman and Weaver go on to offer concrete proposals for reforms to reincorporate this large group of citizens as active participants in American civic and political life.” From Publisher’s website.

Black Market Britain, by Mark Roodhouse. Oxford, UK: New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. 288p.

“Thanks to rationing and price control, Britain's underground economy flourished during the 1940s and early 1950s as producers, traders, and professional criminals helped consumers to get a little extra ‘on the side,’ ‘from under the counter,’ or ‘off the back of a lorry.’ Yet widespread evasion of regulations designed to ensure ‘fair shares for all’ did not undermine the austerity policies that characterised these years.

In Black Market Britain, Mark Roodhouse argues that Britons showed self-restraint in their illegal dealings. The means, motives, and opportunities for evasion were not lacking. The shortages were real, regulations were not watertight, and enforcement was haphazard. Fairness, not patriotism and respect for the law, is the key to understanding this self-restraint. By invoking popular notions of a fair price, a fair profit, and a fair share, government rhetoric limited black marketeering as would-be evaders had to justify their offences both to themselves and others.

Black Market Britain underlines the importance of fairness to those seeking a richer understanding of economic life in modern Britain.” From Publisher’s website.

CCTV: A Technology Under the Radar?, by Inga Kroener. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 162p.

“Central state and non-covert surveillance began in earnest at the start of the twentieth century. By the start of the twenty-first century, the UK was one of the most surveilled societies on earth. This groundbreaking volume by Inga Kroener analyses the particular combination of factors that have created this surveillance state. Kroener argues against the inevitability of the rise of CCTV that is so often found in this literature, to map out the early history of CCTV, tracing its development from a tool for education, safety and transport during the 1950s, to one of politics in the 1970s and 1980s, to eventually become a tool of surveillance during the 1990s. Within this analysis, the complex role of the public in 'allowing' the widespread and rapid dissemination of CCTV is discussed and the representation of CCTV in the media is also studied.

This volume will be of interest to all scholars working in the fields of surveillance studies; science, technology and society departments; and social historians more generally.” From Publisher’s website.

Capital Punishment in Twentieth-Century Britain: Audience, Justice, Memory, by Lizzie Seal. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 188p.

“Capital punishment for murder was abolished in Britain in 1965. At this time, the way people in Britain perceived and understood the death penalty had changed – it was an issue that had become increasingly controversial, high-profile and fraught with emotion. In order to understand why this was, it is necessary to examine how ordinary people learned about and experienced capital punishment.

Drawing on primary research, this book explores the cultural life of the death penalty in Britain in the twentieth century, including an exploration of the role of the popular press and a discussion of portrayals of the death penalty in plays, novels and films. Popular protest against capital punishment and public responses to and understandings of capital cases are also discussed, particularly in relation to conceptualisations of justice. Miscarriages of justice were significant to capital punishment’s increasingly fraught nature in the mid twentieth-century and the book analyses the unsettling power of two such high profile miscarriages of justice. The final chapters consider the continuing relevance of capital punishment in Britain after abolition, including its symbolism and how people negotiate memories of the death penalty.

Capital Punishment in Twentieth-Century Britain is groundbreaking in its attention to the death penalty and the effect it had on everyday life and it is the only text on this era to place public and popular discourses about, and reactions to, capital punishment at the centre of the analysis. Interdisciplinary in focus and methodology, it will appeal to historians, criminologists, sociologists and socio-legal scholars.” From Publisher’s website.

Capital Punishment: New Perspectives, edited by Peter Hodgkinson. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 408p.

“This collection asks questions about the received wisdom of the debate about capital punishment. Woven through the book, questions are asked of, and remedies proposed for, a raft of issues identified as having been overlooked in the traditional discourse. It provides a long overdue review of the disparate groups and strategies that lay claim to abolitionism.

The authors argue that capital litigators should use their skills challenging the abuses not just of process, but of the conditions in which the condemned await their fate, namely prison conditions, education, leisure, visits, medical services, etc. In the aftermath of successful constitutional challenges it is the beneficiaries (arguably those who are considered successes, having been ‘saved’ from the death penalty and now serving living death penalties of one sort or another) who are suffering the cruel and inhumane alternative.

Part I of the book offers a selection of diverse, nuanced examinations of death penalty phenomena, scrutinizing complexities frequently omitted from the narrative of academics and activists. It offers a challenging and comprehensive analysis of issues critical to the abolition debate. Part II offers examinations of countries usually absent from academic analysis to provide an understanding of the status of the debate locally, with opportunities for wider application.” From Publisher’s website.

Controversies in Innocence Cases in America, edited by Sarah Lucy Cooper. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 246p.

“Controversies in Innocence Cases in America brings together leading experts on the investigation, litigation, and scholarly analysis of innocence cases in America, from legal, political and ethical perspectives. The contributors, many of whom work on these cases daily, investigate contemporary issues presented by innocence cases and the exoneration movement as a whole. These issues include the challenges faced by the movement, causes of wrongful convictions, problems associated with investigating, proving, and defining 'innocence', and theories of reform. Each issue is placed within a multi-disciplinary perspective to provide cogent observations and recommendations for the effective handling of these cases, and for what changes should be adopted in order to improve the American criminal justice system when it is faced with its most harrowing sight: an innocent defendant.” From Publisher’s website.

Corruption: Economic Analysis and International Law, by Marco Arnone and Leonardo S. Borlini. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014. 672p.

“Corruption presents many legal and regulatory challenges, but these challenges cannot be met by the law in isolation. This book presents economic analysis of crime as an essential tool for shaping an effective legal apparatus.

The authors contend that in order to assess whether and how to regulate corruption, it is necessary to start with a thorough inquiry into the causes, institutional and social effects, and most of all, actual and potential economic and financial consequences of crimes. This, they argue, should inform and help shape a balanced legal and regulatory approach to corruption.

Economic analysis is also the key to measuring the efficacy of current anti-corruption instruments, and in the light of this the book finds many existing legal counter-measures lacking. On the other hand, its assessment of new international instruments and their domestic implementation and enforcement, and the monitoring mechanisms embedded by certain international organizations, demonstrates a clear relationship between realistic economic analysis and effective solutions to the economic and legal problems posed by corruption.

Offering a comprehensive legal study of corruption and grounded in economic analysis, this detailed book will appeal to scholars and researchers in crime and corruption, international public organizations and anti-corruption agencies.” From Publisher’s website.

Coxsackie: The Life and Death of Prison Reform, by Joseph F. Spillane. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014. 312p.

“Should prisons attempt reform and uplift inmates or, by means of principled punishment, deter them from further wrongdoing? This debate has raged in Western Europe and in the United States at least since the late eighteenth century.

Joseph F. Spillane examines the failure of progressive reform in New York State by focusing on Coxsackie, a New Deal reformatory built for young male offenders. Opened in 1935 to serve "adolescents adrift," Coxsackie instead became an unstable and brutalizing prison. From the start, the liberal impulse underpinning the prison’s mission was overwhelmed by challenges it was unequipped or unwilling to face—drugs, gangs, and racial conflict.

Spillane draws on detailed prison records to reconstruct a life behind bars in which "ungovernable" young men posed constant challenges to racial and cultural order. The New Deal order of the prison was unstable from the start; the politics of punishment quickly became the politics of race and social exclusion, and efforts to save liberal reform in postwar New York only deepened its failures. In 1977, inmates took hostages to focus attention on their grievances. The result was stricter discipline and an end to any pretense that Coxsackie was a reform institution.

Why did the prison fail? For answers, Spillane immerses readers in the changing culture and racial makeup of the U.S. prison system and borrows from studies of colonial prisons, which emblematized efforts by an exploitative regime to impose cultural and racial restraint on others.

In today’s era of mass incarceration, prisons have become conflict-ridden warehouses and powerful symbols of racism and inequality. This account challenges the conventional wisdom that America’s prison crisis is of comparatively recent vintage, showing instead how a racial and punitive system of control emerged from the ashes of a progressive ideal.” From Publisher’s website.

Crime, Community and Morality, by Simon Green. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2013. 228p.

“Political leaders and the popular press tell us that society is in the grip of a moral crisis. ‘Where have our values gone?’ our newspapers scream at us. ‘Benefit scroungers’, ‘greedy bankers’, ‘intrusive journalists’, ‘have-a-go rioters’, political scandals and criminals of all shapes and sizes are continually cited as evidence that we live in a modern-day Gomorrah. Criminologists have studied this in several ways, including: media representations of crime, mass incarceration, hooliganism and the exercise of power and control through communities.

What criminologists have not studied is the place of morality in shaping public debate about understanding crime and how this then shapes crime control strategies. Rather than dismiss statements about community breakdown, ‘broken society’ and irresponsibility as ideological, self-justificatory rhetoric, what happens when we take these claims seriously? What do they tell us about the causes of crime? How do they shape the crime control agenda? How else might we begin to understand and explain the relationship between crime and society?

Navigating between criminological concerns about control and governance and social theories about culture and identity, this book explores what is meant by crime, community and morality and puts this meaning to the test. Discussion of a new theory of rule-breaking, combined with an analysis of how our justice system is becoming maladapted, makes this essential reading for criminologists around the globe, as well as those general readers interested in the causes of crime.” From Publisher’s website.

Crime and Networks, edited by Carlo Morselli. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 346p.

“This innovative collection of original essays showcases the use of social networks in the analysis and understanding of various forms of crime. More than any other past research endeavor, the seventeen chapters in this book apply to criminology the many conceptual and methodological options from social network analysis.

Crime and Networks is the only book of its kind that looks at the use of networks in understanding crime, and can be used for advanced undergraduate and beginner’s graduate level courses in criminal justice and criminology.” From Publisher’s website.

Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Germany: Courts and Adjudicatory Practices in Frankfurt am Main, 1562-1696, by Maria R. Boes. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. 292p.

“Frankfurt am Main, in common with other imperial German cities, enjoyed a large degree of legal autonomy during the early modern period, and produced a unique and rich body of criminal archives. In particular, Frankfurt’s Strafenbuch, which records all criminal sentences between 1562 and 1696, provides a fascinating insight into contemporary penal trends. Drawing on this and other rich resources, Dr. Boes reveals shifting and fluid attitudes towards crime and punishment and how these were conditioned by issues of gender, class, and social standing within the city’s establishment. She attributes a significant role in this process to the steady proliferation of municipal advocates, jurists trained in Roman Law, who wielded growing legal and penal prerogatives.

Over the course of the book, it is demonstrated how the courts took an increasingly hard line with select groups of people accused of criminal behavior, and the open manner with which advocates exercised cultural, religious, racial, gender, and sexual-orientation repressions. Parallel with this, however, is identified a trend of marked leniency towards soldiers who enjoyed an increasingly privileged place within the judicial system. In light of this discrepancy between the treatment of civilians and soldiers, the advocates’ actions highlight the emergence and spread of a distinct military judicial culture and Frankfurt’s city council’s contribution to the quasi-militarization of a civilian court.

By highlighting the polarized and changing ways the courts dealt with civilian and military criminals, a fuller picture is presented not just of Frankfurt’s sentencing and penal practices, but of broader attitudes within early modern Germany to issues of social position and cultural identity.” From Publisher’s website.

The Death Penalty: Volume 1, by Jacques Derrida, translated by Peggy Kamuf. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. 312p.

“In this newest installment in Chicago’s series of Jacques Derrida’s seminars, the renowned philosopher attempts one of his most ambitious goals: the first truly philosophical argument against the death penalty. While much has been written against the death penalty, Derrida contends that Western philosophy is massively, if not always overtly, complicit with a logic in which a sovereign state has the right to take a life. Haunted by this notion, he turns to the key places where such logic has been established—and to the place it has been most effectively challenged: literature.

With his signature genius and patient yet dazzling readings of an impressive breadth of texts, Derrida examines everything from the Bible to Plato to Camus to Jean Genet, with special attention to Kant and post–World War II juridical texts, to draw the landscape of death penalty discourses. Keeping clearly in view the death rows and execution chambers of the United States, he shows how arguments surrounding cruel and unusual punishment depend on what he calls an “anesthesial logic,” which has also driven the development of death penalty technology from the French guillotine to lethal injection. Confronting a demand for philosophical rigor, he pursues provocative analyses of the shortcomings of abolitionist discourse. Above all, he argues that the death penalty and its attendant technologies are products of a desire to put an end to one of the most fundamental qualities of our finite existence: the radical uncertainty of when we will die.

Arriving at a critical juncture in history—especially in the United States, one of the last Christian-inspired democracies to resist abolition—The Death Penalty is both a timely response to an important ethical debate and a timeless addition to Derrida’s esteemed body of work. “ From Publisher’s website.

Disability Incarcerated: Imprisonment and Disability in the United States and Canada, edited by Liat Ben-Moshe, Chris Chapman and Allison C. Carey. London; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 316p.

“Disability Incarcerated offers an outstanding collection of interdisciplinary scholarship examining the incarceration and segregation of people with disabilities the United States and Canada.” From Publisher’s website.

Domestic Intimacies: Incest and the Liberal Subject in Nineteenth-Century America, by Brian Connolly. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. 304p.

“Although it is commonly thought that incest has been taboo throughout history, nineteenth-century Americans evinced a great cultural anxiety that the prohibition was failing. Theologians debated the meaning and limits of biblical proscription, while jurists abandoned such injunctions and invented a new prohibition organized around the nuclear family. Novelists crafted fictional tales of accidental incest resulting from the severed ties between public and private life, while antislavery writers lamented the ramifications of breaking apart enslaved families. Phrenologists and physiologists established reproduction as the primary motivation of the incest prohibition while naturalizing the incestuous eroticism of sentimental family affection. Ethnographers imagined incest as the norm in so-called primitive societies in contrast to modern civilization. In the absence of clear biological or religious limitations, the young republic developed numerous, varied, and contradictory incest prohibitions.

Domestic Intimacies offers a wide-ranging, critical history of incest and its various prohibitions as they were defined throughout the nineteenth century. Historian Brian Connolly argues that at the center of these convergent anxieties and debates lay the idea of the liberal subject: an autonomous individual who acted on his own desires yet was tempered by reason, who enjoyed a life in public yet was expected to find his greatest satisfaction in family and home. Always lurking was the need to exercise personal freedom with restraint; indeed, the valorization of the affectionate family was rooted in its capacity to act as a bulwark against licentiousness. However it was defined, incest was thus not only perceived as a threat to social stability; it also functioned to regulate social relations—within families and between classes as well as among women and men, slaves and free citizens, strangers and friends. Domestic Intimacies overturns conventional histories of American liberalism by placing the fear of incest at the heart of nineteenth-century conflicts over public life and privacy, kinship and individualism, social contracts and personal freedom.” From Publisher’s website.

EU Security and Justice Law: After Lisbon and Stockholm, edited by Diego Acosta Arcarazo and Cian C. Murphy. Oxford, UK: Hart Publishing, 2014. 246p.

“The coming into force of the Lisbon Treaty has provided the EU with new powers in the fields of criminal law and security law while reinforcing existing powers in immigration and asylum law. The Stockholm Programme is the latest framework for EU action in the field of justice and home affairs. It includes a range of new legislation in the fields of immigration and asylum, substantive criminal law, criminal procedure and co-operation between national criminal justice systems. The combination of the new treaty and programme have made security and justice key areas of legislative growth in the EU. This volume brings together a range of leading scholars, as well as some of the most interesting new voices in the debate, to examine the state of EU security and justice law after the Lisbon Treaty and the Stockholm Programme. It provides a critical examination of EU law in the fields of immigration, asylum, counter-terrorism, citizenship, fundamental rights and external relations. The book also examines the evolving roles of the EU institutions and criminal justice agencies. It provides a critical account of EU law in this field under the developing constitutional and institutional settlement.” From Publisher’s website.

Emotions, Decision-Making and Mass Atrocities: Through the Lens of the Macro-Micro Integrated Theoretical Model, by Olaoluwa Olusanya. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 154p.

“This book rehumanizes perpetrators of mass atrocities. At present a victim/perpetrator dichotomy appears to be the dominant paradigm: perpetrators have either been ‘mechanistically dehumanized’, that is, perceived as unemotional, hard-hearted and conforming and thereby lacking the core features of human nature or alternatively, they have been ‘animalistically dehumanized’. In other words they are seen as immoral, unintelligent, lacking self-control and likened to animals.

Within sociology and criminology the dominant view is that genocide and other mass atrocities are committed by technologically-lobotomized perpetrators. Somehow the process of rationalization is believed to have transformed these people from emotionally healthy people into hollow soulless shells of human beings or zombies, devoid of a full range of normal emotions. These people are considered bereft of any ability to reason, think or feel, yet ambulant and able to respond to surrounding stimuli.

However it is difficult to imagine crime (especially those involving a group of people working together for the duration of a particular criminal activity) without emotions. For instance, there is ample evidence suggesting that both crimes of passion and pre-meditated crimes involve emotional arousal. Furthermore, research in fields such as evolutionary biology, psychology and sociology of work and organizations suggest that emotions are essential for human progress and survival. In addition, emotions help us make the right call in risky and uncertain situations, in other words, the majority of real life situations. There is, therefore, a need to revisit existing assumptions around the role of emotions in mass atrocities.” From Publisher’s website.

The Encyclopedia of Liars and Deceivers, by Roelf Bolt. London: Reaktion Books, 2014. 256p.

“No one likes to be taken in, but stories of deception concerning others are compelling. It can be startling to learn of the credulousness of those who fall for schemes or untruths spun out by liars, cheats, fraudsters, fakers, even unfaithful lovers . . . But deceit should not always be condemned: think of items counterfeited in jest, or satires that expose pretentiousness, or the necessity for forged identity papers in occupied Europe under the Nazis, or ingenious tricks by the Allies to wrongfoot German forces.

To collect these stories of deceit Roelf Bolt has ranged widely, from ancient times to the present day, documenting a huge assortment of legerdemain: infamous quacks, fraudulent scientists, crooks who committed ‘pseudocide’ by faking their own deaths, forgers of paintings and drawings, decorative arts, archaeological finds and documents of every sort. From counterfeit medicines and banknotes to bogus perpetual wonder-working machines and sports memorabilia, Bolt reveals that almost everything has been forged or faked by someone at some point in history. He offers biographies and general observations on specific categories of deceit, and the book includes a number of well-known figures – Einstein, Ernest Hemingway and President François Mitterand among them – as well as the many individuals who would have remained anonymous had their duplicity not come to light. All take their rightful place in the bizarre catalogue of comedy, crime and occasional genius that is The Encyclopaedia of Liars and Deceivers, the perfect gift for all those who enjoy a good story – and those people who like to tell them.” From Publisher’s website.

Exploring Green Criminology: Toward a Green Criminological Revolution, by Michael J. Lynch and Paul B. Stretesky. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 236p.

“Few criminologists have drawn attention to the fact that widespread and significant forms of harm such as green or environmental crimes are neglected by criminology. Others have suggested that green crimes present the most important challenge to criminology as a discipline. This book argues that criminology needs to take green harms more seriously and to be revolutionized so that it forms part of the solution to the large environmental problems currently faced across the world. It asks how criminology should be redesigned to consider green/environmental harm as a key area of study in an era where destruction of the earth and the world’s ecosystem is a major concern and examines why this has remained unaccomplished so far.

The chapters in this book apply an environmental frame of reference underlying a green approach to issues which can be addressed from within criminology and which can encourage criminologists and environmentalists to respond and react differently to environmental crime.” From Publisher’s website.

Flexible Workers: Labour, Regulation and the Political Economy of the Stripping Industry, by Teela Sanders and Kate Hardy. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2013. 206p.

“Striptease and other types of erotic dance increasingly make up a large, lucrative and visible part of the sex industries in the United Kingdom and 'lap dancing' has become the focus of many important contemporary debates about gender, work and sexuality. This new book from Teela Sanders and Kate Hardy moves away from the more traditional focus on the relations between dancers and customers, to a focus on regulation and the working conditions experienced by those working in stripping work. Drawing on interviews, survey data and participant observation with dancers, managers, regulators and other staff, Sanders and Hardy present the first ever nationwide study of the stripping industry and the working lives of those within it.
The book explores the reasons for the expansion of the industry in the United Kingdom and the experiences, opinions and perspectives of those that produce and shape it. Placing dancers' voices centre stage, it examines the wider political economy which shapes dancers' engagement in employment in the stripping industry, pointing towards the wider conditions of the labour market and growing privatisation of Higher Education as explanatory factors for its labour supply. In suggesting a new feminist politics of stripping, dancers voice their own political awareness of erotic dance and an intersectional analysis of solidarity with workers in the stripping industry is foregrounded.
Presenting a 360 degree view of the industry, this ground-breaking study presents systematic evidence for the first time on this area of social life which has become central as a strategy of survival, class mobility and urban accumulation. It will appeal to undergraduate and postgraduate students across the fields of criminology, sociology, geography, labour studies and gender studies, as well as regulators, activists and even dancers themselves.” From Publisher’s website.

Football Hooliganism, Fan Behaviour and Crime, edited by Matt Hopkins and James Treadwell. London; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 328p.

“Focusing on a number a of contemporary research themes and placing them within the context of palpable changes that have occurred within football in recent years, this timely collection brings together essays about football, crime and fan behaviour from leading experts in the fields of criminology, law, sociology, psychology and cultural studies.

Examining issues such as the links between football supporter sub-cultures and hate crime, football and corruption, football as a crime generator and the policing of crowds, this volume moves forward the debate on football hooliganism, situating the study of football and crime into appropriate historical, theoretical and policy contexts. This valuable collection illustrates that the analysis of football and fan behaviours still has much to offer the criminological community.” From Publisher’s website.

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in a New Era, by Mike Koehler. Cheltenham, UK; Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014. 416p.

“The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) has emerged as a top concern for companies doing business in the global marketplace. This book is the first of its kind given its comprehensive and provocative coverage of the FCPA and its many related legal and policy issues.

In The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in a New Era, Professor Koehler dissects the FCPA’s new era and confronts the FCPA statutory text, legislative history, judicial decisions, enforcement agency guidance, and resolved FCPA enforcement actions.

Written by a former FCPA attorney with expert knowledge and experience relevant to the issues discussed, the book injects innovative concepts to the study of the FCPA and its enforcement such as the ‘world’s most ethical FCPA violators,’ ‘the façade of enforcement’ the ‘three buckets’ of FCPA financial exposure, ‘FCPA Inc. and the business of bribery,’ and the ‘offensive use’ of the FCPA. The book places an emphasis on learning FCPA issues incrementally in the belief that foundational knowledge (such as general legal principles and general Department of Justice and Securities and Exchange Commission enforcement policies and resolution vehicles) will best enhance understanding and comprehension of specific FCPA topics.

Understanding the FCPA’s new era is a fundamental skill-set for a diverse group of professionals navigating the global marketplace. This book provides a toolkit that will help readers from the boardroom to the courtroom to the classroom better understand the FCPA, FCPA enforcement, FCPA compliance strategies, and the many legal and policy issues present in this new era.” From Publisher’s website.

The Global Decline of the Mandatory Death Penalty: Constitutional Jurisprudence and Legislative Reform in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, by Andrew Novak. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 200p.

“Historically, at English common law, the death penalty was mandatory for the crime of murder and other violent felonies. Over the last three decades, however, many former British colonies have reformed their capital punishment regimes to permit judicial sentencing discretion, including consideration of mitigating factors. Applying a comparative analysis to the law of capital punishment, Novak examines the constitutional jurisprudence and resulting legislative reform in the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia, focusing on the rapid retreat of the mandatory death penalty in the Commonwealth over the last thirty years.

The coordinated mandatory death penalty challenges - which have had the consequence of greatly reducing the world’s death row population - represent a case study of how a small group of lawyers can sponsor human rights litigation that incorporates international human rights law into domestic constitutional jurisprudence, ultimately harmonizing criminal justice regimes across borders.

This book is essential reading for anyone interested in the study and development of human rights and capital punishment, as well as those exploring the contours of comparative criminal justice.” From Publisher’s website.

Global Gangs: Street Violence across the World, edited by Jennifer M. Hazen and Dennis Rodgers. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 2014. 312p.

“Gangs, often associated with brutality and senseless destructive violence, have not always been viewed as inherently antagonistic. The first studies of gangs depicted them as alternative sources of order in urban slums where the state’s authority was lacking, and they have subsequently been shown to be important elements in some youth life cycles. Despite their proliferation there is little consensus regarding what constitutes a gang. Used to denote phenomena ranging from organized crime syndicates to groups of youths who gather spontaneously on street corners, even the term ‘gang’ is ambiguous.

Global Gangs offers a greater understanding of gangs through essays that investigate gangs spanning across nations, from Brazil to Indonesia, China to Kenya, and from El Salvador to Russia. Volume editors Jennifer M. Hazen and Dennis Rodgers bring together contributors who examine gangs from a comparative perspective, discussing such topics as the role the apartheid regime in South Africa played in the emergence of gangs, the politics behind child vigilante squads in India, the relationship between immigration and gangs in France and the United States, and the complex stigmatization of youths in Mexico caused by the arbitrary deployment of the word ‘gang.’

Featuring an afterword by renowned U.S. gang researcher Sudhir Venkatesh, Global Gangs provides a comprehensive look into the experience of gangs across the world and in doing so challenges conventional notions of identity. “ From Publisher’s website.

Globalisation and the Challenge to Criminology, edited by Francis Pakes. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2012. 184p.

“There is no doubt that globalisation has profound effects on crime, justice and our feelings of security, identity and belonging. Many of these affect both the making of laws and the breaking of laws. It has been argued however that criminology has been too provincial, focusing as it often does on national laws and issues, whilst others have said that globalisation is the stuff of international relations, global finance and trade, not of criminology. This book disputes this by asserting that criminology has a firm place in this arena and globalisation offers the discipline a challenge that it should relish.

Some of the field’s top scholars from the UK, the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand consider these challenges and present cutting-edge analysis and debate. Topics covered include transnational organised crime, international policing and a range of other issues involving global harm such as genocide, the workings of international financial institutions, the fate of international migrants and the impact of anti-immigration sentiments in Europe. A particular focus is on borders and arrangements that deal with migration and populations that are excluded and adrift.

This book highlights criminology’s analysis and engagement in new understandings of globalisation, in particular its harmful and unethical manifestations, and offers a mode of scrutiny and vigilance. Globalisation and the Challenge to Criminology will be of particular interest to those studying criminology, criminal justice, policing, security and international relations as well as those who seek to understand globalisation and, in particular, its harmful outcomes.” From Publisher’s website.

The Good, the Bad, and the Just: How Modern Men Shape Their World, by Riel Vermunt. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 338p.

“Drawing on multidisciplinary findings and ideas, this book discusses fair allocation of social resources, such as goods, services and information, in a novel and integrated way. The role of the essential features of allocation behavior: motivation, cognition and emotion, as well as morality and reactions to perceived unfairness are examined in the newly developed Justice Model. The author offers explanations as to why, how and to what extent, people, in an effort to attain justice, allocate social resources between self and others and among others. It is held that the allocation event, featuring actor, recipient and observer, as well as the resources to be allocated by an actor, can function as a guideline for the essentials of fair behavior. The work explores the conditions under which an actor may deviate from a just division of social resources thus instigating a reaction from recipients and observers. The study covers various levels of analysis ranging from the intra-personal to the societal.

The book will be of interest to academics and researchers working in the areas of crime, law, justice, public policy and governance.” From Publisher’s website.

The Gun Debate: What Everyone Needs to Know®, by Philip J. Cook and Kristin A. Goss. Oxford, UK: New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 296p.

“No topic is more polarizing than guns and gun control. From a gun culture that took root early in American history to the mass shootings that repeatedly bring the public discussion of gun control to a fever pitch, the topic has preoccupied citizens, public officials, and special interest groups for decades.

The Gun Debate: What Everyone Needs to Know® delves into the issues that Americans debate when they talk about guns. With a balanced and broad-ranging approach, noted economist Philip J. Cook and political scientist Kristin A. Goss thoroughly cover the latest research, data, and developments on gun ownership, gun violence, the firearms industry, and the regulation of firearms. The authors also tackle sensitive issues such as the effectiveness of gun control, the connection between mental illness and violent crime, the question of whether more guns make us safer, and ways that video games and the media might contribute to gun violence. No discussion of guns in the U.S. would be complete without consideration of the history, culture, and politics that drive the passion behind the debate. Cook and Goss deftly explore the origins of the American gun culture and the makeup of both the gun rights and gun control movements.

Written in question-and-answer format, the book will help readers make sense of the ideologically driven statistics and slogans that characterize our national conversation on firearms. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in getting a clear view of the issues surrounding guns and gun policy in America.” From Publisher’s website.

A Handbook for Evidence-Based Juvenile Justice Systems, by James C. Howell, Mark W. Lipsey, and John J. Wilson. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2014. 200p.

“This handbook promotes a comprehensive strategy founded on evidence-based programming for juvenile justice systems to adopt or enhance their current system. The comprehensive strategy is supported strongly by the broad research base that is now available. This strategy recognizes, first, that a relatively small proportion of the juveniles who initially enter the juvenile justice system will prove to be serious, violent, or chronic offenders, but that group accounts for a large proportion of the overall amount of delinquency. An important component of a comprehensive evidence-based juvenile justice system, therefore, is distinguishing these offenders from others and focusing attention and resources on that smaller group. Second, a comprehensive strategy recognizes that serious, violent, or chronic delinquency emerges along developmental pathways that progress from less to more serious profiles of offending. Priority must be given to interrupting these offender careers by calibrating the level of supervision and control of the juveniles’ behavior to their level of risk. The third major component of a comprehensive strategy, therefore, is effective intervention programs that are capable of reducing the recidivism of those juveniles at risk for further delinquency. The Comprehensive Strategy for Serious, Violent, and Chronic Juvenile Offenders is an administrative framework that supports a continuum of services that parallel the development of offender careers. This framework emphasizes evidence-based programming specifically on recidivism reduction, and supports protocols for developing comprehensive treatment plans that match effective services with offender treatment needs along the life-course of delinquent careers, as they move from intake onward, to probation, community programs, confinement, and reentry. Juvenile justice systems will benefit from incorporation of a comprehensive strategy as provided in the handbook.” From Publisher’s website.

Hate Crime and Restorative Justice: Exploring Causes, Repairing Harms, by Mark Austin Walters. Oxford, UK: New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 352p.

  • “The first study of its kind on hate crime and restorative justice, utilising original empirical research
  • Highlights the complex social variables that are causal to hate incidents and which are key to addressing this type of offending
  • Offers a more holistic understanding of how restorative justice can help repair the harms caused by processes of hate, using both theoretical assumptions and empirical evidence
  • Presents detailed case studies exploring the issue of group identity and cultural 'difference' amongst participants of restorative justice

The product of an 18 month empirical study which examined the use of restorative justice for hate crime in the United Kingdom, this book draws together theory and practice in order to examine the causes and consequences of hate crime victimisation. Hate Crime and Restorative Justice: Exploring Causes, Repairing Harms also identifies the key process variables within restorative practice that can help to repair the harms of hatred. In doing so, it challenges commonly held conceptions of both 'hate crime' and 'restorative justice' through its use of qualitative research of restorative interventions across the UK.

The study's findings provide original data on the contextual variables that are intrinsic to both the cause and effect of hate-motivated offences, revealing complex socio-cultural and socio-economic factors that are fundamental, both to our understanding of hate crime and to how such incidents can be best resolved. Through meticulous analysis and discussion, the book also provides new information on how restorative processes can be used to repair the harms of hate and challenge the prejudices which give rise to hate-motivated conflicts. The issue of group identity and cultural 'difference' amongst participants of restorative justice is explored and examined through the use of detailed case studies, allowing assessment of whether dialogical barriers to reconciliation can limit the success of restorative processes. In particular, the notion of 'community', a fundamental concept of restorative justice theory and practice, is reconceptualised by exploring both its healing and harming features.

Utilising data from the first study of its kind, Hate Crime and Restorative Justice draws together theoretical assumptions about restorative philosophy and empirical evidence of its use for hate crime to offer a more holistic understanding of how restorative justice can help repair the harms caused by processes of hate, while simultaneously challenging the identity-based prejudices that continue to pervade our multicultural communities.

Readership: Restorative and criminal justice practitioners, police officers and policy makers, as well as scholars of criminology, sociology and criminal justice.” From Publisher’s website.

Hatred, Lies, and Violence in the World of Islam, by Raphael Israeli. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2014. 358p.

Hatred, Lies, and Violence in the World of Islam examines the torrential flood of anti-Israeli, anti-Jewish, and anti-Zionist propaganda that permeates many Muslim societies. Raphael Israeli locates the source of this anti-Semitic sentiment in the inadequacies and insecurities of Muslim states. By demonizing and delegitimizing Israel and Jews, they seek to eliminate a successful counterexample of their own failures, thus putting an end to their own "humiliation."

Beyond mapping the distribution of anti-Israel and anti-Jewish propaganda in the Arab and Islamic worlds, Israeli uses case-studies to illustrate the premises of this study: the Palestinians, who have a direct stake in battling Israel; Turkey, which now claims leadership of the Arab and Sunni Muslim worlds; and Shi’ite Iran, which provides a more extreme example of both hatred and disregard for fact and history while threatening to destroy Israel.

Israeli documents the worldwide collaboration between Jew-haters of all sorts, explaining the exponential growth of Jew-hatred on the Internet, with thousands of new hate sites added every year, outpacing Jew-hatred in the traditional media. He places anti-Semitism in a broader tradition of political lies and political deceit. In the final chapter, Israeli considers the possibility of reversing anti-Jewish agitation in Muslim countries, which he finds unlikely because so many of the region’s regimes are built on foundations of anti-Semitism.” From Publisher’s website.

Hegemonic Individualism and Subversive Stories in Capital Mitigation, by Ross Kleinstuber. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 184p.

“Capital punishment policies in the USA are almost always justified by an individualistic belief in either rational choice or dispositional attribution, which justifies the death penalty either as a deterrent, or for retributive or incapacitative purposes. This book takes an in-depth look at the mitigation process and the use of individualism in the capital sentencing process. The work examines the use of individualistic (hegemonic) and contextualizing (subversive) discourses in the mitigation cases presented by capital defense attorneys and experts from trials in Delaware, and how these discourses were understood, interpreted, and utilized by jurors who served on those trials and by the judges who imposed the final sentences. This in-depth sociological examination of the use of individualizing and contextualizing accounts throughout the entire mitigation process helps to illuminate the challenges involved in structuring a death penalty that is not arbitrary in a culture that is overwhelmed by individualizing discourses, and thus struggles to account for the entrenched racial and economic inequality that is so conducive to lethal violence. In conclusion, it questions the entire premise of the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence of death, which rests on a belief that the discretion of decision makers can be 'guided' in a way that accounts for contextualizing evidence and will reduce the death penalty’s arbitrary and discriminatory application.” From Publisher’s website.

Heroin and Music in New York City, by Barry Sprunt. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 256p.

“Heroin abuse amongst musicians has never been limited to one genre, but the nature of the connection between heroin and music is not well understood at all. Narrative accounts from a sample of 69 New York City-based musicians and self-acknowledged heroin abusers will address the beginnings of their heroin addictions, it's prevalence amongst artists in certain music genres, and the impact -detrimental or otherwise- heroin has on musicians' playing, creativity, and careers.” From Publisher’s website.

The History of “Zero Tolerance” in American Public Schooling, by Judith Kafka. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. 196p.

“Through a case study of the Los Angeles city school district from the 1950s through the 1970s, Judith Kafka explores the intersection of race, politics, and the bureaucratic organization of schooling. Kafka argues that control over discipline became increasingly centralized in the second half of the twentieth century in response to pressures exerted by teachers, parents, students, principals, and local politicians - often at different historical moments, and for different purposes. Kafka demonstrates that the racial inequities produced by today's school discipline policies were not inevitable, nor are they immutable.” From Publisher’s website.

The Human Trafficking Cycle: Sinai and Beyond, by Mirjam van Reisen, Meron Estefanos, and Conny Rijken. Oisterwijk, Netherlands: Wolf Legal Publishers, 2014. 200p.

“Human trafficking in the Sinai started in 2009 and involves the abduction, extortion, sale, torture and killing of men, women and children. This book follows from the publication “Human Trafficking in the Sinai: Refugees between Life and Death” (2012). It describes how refugees are abducted and brought to the Sinai and identifies the modus operandi of the trafficking. It also looks at what happens after the hostages are released and where they go. This book introduces the term ‘trafficking cycle’ to describe how refugees become trapped in a vicious cycle of detention, exploitation and abuse, or take risks that may lead to tragedies such as the shipwreck off the coast of Lampedusa on 3 October 2013. It also portrays how Sinai survivors remain owners of their own history and keepers of their own dignity. The book is based on interviews with hostages and survivors of the trafficking in the Sinai and others.” From Publisher’s website.

Inside Police Custody: An Empirical Account of Suspects’ Rights in Four Jurisdictions, by Jodie Blackstock, Ed Cape, Jacqueline Hodgson, Anna Ogorodova and Taru Spronken. Cambridge, UK: Intersentia Ltd., 2014. 575p.

“This empirical study of the procedural rights of suspects in four EU jurisdictions – France, Scotland, the Netherlands and England and Wales – focuses on three of the procedural rights set out in the EU Roadmap for strengthening the procedural rights of suspected or accused persons in criminal proceedings – the right to interpretation and translation; the right to information and the letter of rights; and the right to legal assistance before and during police interrogation.

In order to examine how these procedural rights operate in practice, the authors spent between two and five months in eight field sites across the four jurisdictions. During this time they observed lawyers and police officers during the period of police custody; examined case records; observed lawyer-client consultations; and attended suspect interrogations. Furthermore, they conducted 75 interviews with police officers, lawyers and accredited legal representatives.

In addition to producing and analysing empirical data, the authors have developed training guidelines for lawyers and police officers involved in the police detention process for use across the EU. The project team also produced a series of recommendations for legislative and policy changes designed to ensure better enforcement of the EU procedural rights’ instruments that are envisaged in the Stockholm Programme.

The study was carried out by the Universities of Maastricht, Warwick and the West of England, together with JUSTICE. Avon and Somerset Police and the Open Society Justice Initiative were also collaborators on the project.” From Publisher’s website.

International Criminal Law: Using or Abusing Authority?, by Edwin Bikundo. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 204p.

“This book analyses the relationship between law and violence, the utility of law over violence and whether legality as an approach has an inherent disability in addressing mass violence as a crime. The study is located within international law and assesses whether prosecuting political violence would necessarily entail an abuse of the legal process. The intention is to encourage definition of criminal aggression via legal processes laid down by the International Criminal Court, rather than giving favour to political action under the United Nations Charter.

Issues discussed in the book include the controversies over the location of the crime of aggression in either law or politics, taking a legal approach to the problems outlined. Using examples from Libya, the Ivory Coast, and Kenya, the work will be of interest to those working in the areas of international criminal justice, international law, legal theory, and international relations.” From Publisher’s website.

Killer Weed: Marijuana, Grow Ops, Media, and Justice, by Susan C. Boyd and Connie I. Carter. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014. 304p.

“Since the late 1990s, marijuana grow operations have been identified by media and others as a new and dangerous criminal activity of “epidemic” proportions. With Killer Weed, Susan C. Boyd and Connie Carter use their analysis of fifteen years of newspaper coverage to show how consensus about the dangerous people and practices associated with marijuana cultivation was created and disseminated by numerous spokespeople including police, RCMP, and the media in Canada. The authors focus on the context of media reports in Canada to show how claims about marijuana cultivation have intensified the perception that this activity poses “significant” dangers to public safety and thus is an appropriate target for Canada’s war on drugs.
Boyd and Carter carefully show how the media draw on the same spokespeople to tell the same story again and again, and how a limited number of messages has led to an expanding anti-drug campaign that uses not only police, but BC Hydro and local municipalities to crack down on drug production. Going beyond the newspapers, Killer Weed examines how legal, political, and civil initiatives that have emerged from the media narrative have troubling consequences for a shrinking Canadian civil society.” From Publisher’s website.

Legitimacy and Trust in Criminal Law, Policy and Justice: Norms, Procedures, Outcomes, edited by Nina Persak. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 204p.

“Whereas previous studies of legitimacy and trust have mostly dealt with procedural justice and the police, this book focuses on other crucial understudied aspects of legitimacy within criminal law, policy and criminal justice. The chapters expand and develop current criminological, legal and socio-legal research by addressing conceptions of legitimacy linked to criminal law norms, criminalisation and sanctioning; by examining EU legal and policy aspects of the phenomenon; and by exploring some specific court-related issues of legitimacy and trust, hitherto neglected.

With contributions from across the EU, this interdisciplinary collection presents a valuable discussion on the importance of trust in legal institutions of modern democracies and suggests ideas for future research in this area to challenge ways of thinking about legitimacy.” From Publisher’s website.

The Law and Practices of Piracy at Sea: European and International Perspectives, edited by Panos Koutrakos and Achilles Skordas. Oxford, UK: Hart Publishing, 2014. 414p.

“This collection of essays provides a comprehensive assessment of the legal and policy approaches to maritime counter-piracy adopted by the EU and other international actors over the last few years. As the financial cost of Somali piracy for the maritime industry and the world economy as a whole was estimated to have reached $18 billion by 2010, the phenomenon of piracy at sea has steadily grown in significance and has recently attracted the attention of international policy makers. Moreover, piracy is intrinsically linked to state failure and other pathologies bred by it, such as organised crime and terrorism.

This book adopts a holistic approach to the topic, examining approaches to piracy as these emerge in different geographical areas, as well as tackling the central issues which counter-piracy raises in terms of the most topical aspects of international law (international humanitarian law and armed conflict, piracy and terrorism, use of force). It also focuses on the approach of the EU, placing counter-piracy in its broader legal context. Providing a detailed doctrinal exploration of the issues which counter-piracy raises, it emphasises and draws upon the insights of the practice of counter-piracy by bringing together academic lawyers and the legal advisers of the main actors in the area (EU, US, NATO, UK).

The book raises fundamental questions about the law and practice of international law: are the rules of the international law of the sea on piracy still relevant? To what extent has the shared interest of international actors in tackling piracy given rise to common practices? Do the interactions among the actors examined in the book suggest fragmentation or unity of the international legal order? Is it premature to view these interactions as signalling the gradual emergence of global law in the area? This common analytical frame of reference is underlined by the concluding part, which draws these threads together.

The book will be of interest to legal scholars, political scientists and international relations theorists, as well as decision-makers and students of law, politics and international relations.” From Publisher’s website.

Making Crime Television: Producing Entertaining Representations of Crime for Television Broadcast, by Anita Lam. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 216p.

“This book employs actor-network theory in order to examine how representations of crime are produced for contemporary prime-time television dramas. As a unique examination of the production of contemporary crime television dramas, particularly their writing process, Making Crime Television: Producing Entertaining Representations of Crime for Television Broadcast examines not only the semiotic relations between ideas about crime, but the material conditions under which those meanings are formulated.

Using ethnographic and interview data, Anita Lam considers how textual representations of crime are assembled by various people (including writers, directors, technical consultants, and network executives), technologies (screenwriting software and whiteboards), and texts (newspaper articles and rival crime dramas). The emerging analysis does not project but instead concretely examines what and how television writers and producers know about crime, law and policing. An adequate understanding of the representation of crime, it is maintained, cannot be limited to a content analysis that treats the representation as a final product. Rather, a television representation of crime must be seen as the result of a particular assemblage of logics, people, creative ideas, commercial interests, legal requirements, and broadcasting networks. A fascinating investigation into the relationship between television production, crime, and the law, this book is an accessible and well-researched resource for students and scholars of Law, Media, and Criminology.” From Publisher’s website.

The Mental Element in International Criminal Law, edited by Kristina Janjac and Dorina Andoni. The Hague: International Courts Association, 2014. 372p.

“’Actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea.’ --- There can be no criminal responsibility without a subjective relationship that could be defined as intent or negligence (mens rea) of the individual in question towards his actions (actus reus). Regulation of the mental element in the general part of the Rome Statute represents a major step forward in the development of international criminal law, since, so far, none of the statutes of international courts contained general rules on this issue. The focus of this book is Article 30 of the Rome Statute, which contains the default rule on guilt, and defines intent as a basic form of it. Pursuant to the jurisprudence of the ad hoc Tribunals of the United Nations for Yugoslavia and Rwanda, criminal responsibility can be imposed only when both its cognitive and volitional component are fulfilled. For a better comprehension, this book also includes a selection of documents on the "Elements of Crimes." (Series: International Criminal Law - Vol. 9)

On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City, by Alice Goffman. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014. 288p.

“Forty years in, the War on Drugs has done almost nothing to prevent drugs from being sold or used, but it has nonetheless created a little-known surveillance state in America’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Arrest quotas and high-tech surveillance techniques criminalize entire blocks, and transform the very associations that should stabilize young lives—family, relationships, jobs—into liabilities, as the police use such relationships to track down suspects, demand information, and threaten consequences. Alice Goffman spent six years living in one such neighborhood in Philadelphia, and her close observations and often harrowing stories reveal the pernicious effects of this pervasive policing. Goffman introduces us to an unforgettable cast of young African American men who are caught up in this web of warrants and surveillance—some of them small-time drug dealers, others just ordinary guys dealing with limited choices. All find the web of presumed criminality, built as it is on the very associations and friendships that make up a life, nearly impossible to escape. We watch as the pleasures of summer-evening stoop- sitting are shattered by the arrival of a carful of cops looking to serve a warrant; we watch—and can’t help but be shocked—as teenagers teach their younger siblings and cousins how to run from the police (and, crucially, to keep away from friends and family so they can stay hidden); and we see, over and over, the relentless toll that the presumption of criminality takes on families—and futures.

While not denying the problems of the drug trade, and the violence that often accompanies it, through her gripping accounts of daily life in the through her gripping accounts of daily life in the forgotten neighborhoods of America's cities, Goffman makes it impossible for us to ignore the very real human costs of our failed response—the blighting of entire neighborhoods, and the needless sacrifice of whole generations.” From Publisher’s website.

Organizational Change Through Individual Empowerment: Applying Social Psychology in Prisons and Policing, by Hans Toch. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2014. 186p.

“How does meaningful change occur? What is the role of the psychologist in promoting change?

These questions drive this incisive retrospective by social psychologist Hans Toch, who has spearheaded participatory change over the years among violence-prone police, disenfranchised corrections officers, and inmates dehumanized by the misapplication of psychology in Supermax segregation units.
Approaching each circumstance as a unique challenge, Toch has centered his work on simple tenets: treat humans as human, ameliorate environmental harm, and promote democracy by teaching individuals how to stand up and participate in their lives.

By highlighting the necessity of active participation among stakeholders, Toch has shown process in social psychology to be more important than product. He demonstrates that psychology is best practiced not in the ivory tower but in the real world, among real people, seeking real answers to seemingly intractable problems. Toch displays a tender appreciation for the subjective experiences of people caught in difficult situations.

Filled with amusing anecdotes and the wisdom of experience, this book displays the best that a life in applied psychology has to offer: a commitment not to behavioral theories or institutions, but to people.” From Publisher’s website.

Pathways to Sexual Aggression, edited by Jean Proulx, Eric Beauregard, Patrick Lussier, and Benoit Leclerc. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 362p.

“Most people who read an article in the newspaper about the brutal rape of a woman by a stranger, or the long-standing sexual abuse of a young boy by his step-father have a strong visceral reaction which is a mix of anger, fear, and incomprehension. Apart from these aversive reactions, several questions also come to people’s minds: Was this offender crazy or sexually obsessed? What is the purpose of such outrageous acts?

To answer these questions, the authors of this book review theoretical and empirical models of the processes that lead men to sexually assault children or women, whilst also presenting new results and models on this topic. In particular, this book focuses on empirical analyses of the pathways of six types of sexual aggressors, three of which (marital rapists, hebephilic sexual aggressors, and polymorphic sexual aggressors) have never been investigated before.
Drawing on a large dataset on the offending processes of sexual aggressors, this book analyzes the influence of personality factors and lifestyle factors on offending pathways and brings together key researchers in the field of sexual aggression. This book will be of interest to psychologists, psychiatrists, criminologists, and social workers involved in the study, assessment and treatment of sexual aggressors. In addition, this information will be crucial for practitioners involved in the follow-up of these offenders in the community, and will interest researchers and graduate students in the field of sexual aggression.” From Publisher’s website.

Perceptions of Criminal Justice, by Vicky de Mesmaecker. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 170p.

“In recent decades, research into the legitimacy of criminal justice has convincingly demonstrated the importance of procedural justice to citizens’ sense of trust and confidence in legal authorities and their resulting willingness to conform to the law and cooperate with the legal authorities. Reversing the age-old question ‘why do people break the law?’, theories of procedural justice have provided insight into the factors that encourage people to abide by the law, suggesting that experiences of procedural fairness are crucial to achieving compliance with the law and to enhancing the legitimacy of criminal justice.
While these studies are important in showing that legal authorities need to pay attention to the fairness judgements of the people involved in legal procedures, the focus on showing the importance of procedural justice has had the ironic consequence of distracting researchers from studying the equally important question of what fairness means to the people involved in legal proceedings.

In one of the first studies on procedural justice to use a qualitative research design, the author provides the reader with detailed and insightful descriptions of the elements that determine how victims and defendants assess the fairness of their contact with the police and the courts. Focusing on both the pre-trial and the post-trial phases, this book will be of interest to academics and students engaged in the study of the psychology of law, procedural justice and the legitimacy of criminal justice.” From Publisher’s website.

Police Power and Race Riots: Urban Unrest in Paris and New York, by Cathy Lisa Schneider. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014. 344p.

“Three weeks after Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a New York City police officer shot and killed a fifteen-year-old black youth, inciting the first of almost a decade of black and Latino riots throughout the United States. In October 2005, French police chased three black and Arab teenagers into an electrical substation outside Paris, culminating in the fatal electrocution of two of them. Fires blazed in Parisian suburbs and housing projects throughout France for three consecutive weeks. Cathy Lisa Schneider explores the political, legal, and economic conditions that led to violent confrontations in neighborhoods on opposite sides of the Atlantic half a century apart.

Police Power and Race Riots traces the history of urban upheaval in New York and greater Paris, focusing on the interaction between police and minority youth. Schneider shows that riots erupted when elites activated racial boundaries, police engaged in racialized violence, and racial minorities lacked alternative avenues of redress. She also demonstrates how local activists who cut their teeth on the American race riots painstakingly constructed social movement organizations with standard nonviolent repertoires for dealing with police violence. These efforts, along with the opening of access to courts of law for ethnic and racial minorities, have made riots a far less common response to police violence in the United States today. Rich in historical and ethnographic detail, Police Power and Race Riots offers a compelling account of the processes that fan the flames of urban unrest and the dynamics that subsequently quell the fires.” From Publisher’s website.

Policing the Waterfront: Networks, Partnerships, and the Governance of Port Security, by Russell Brewer. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 352p.

“Long recognised as a site where criminal elements have flourished, for centuries the waterfront has been exploited by opportunistic individuals for a whole raft of illicit purposes. History has shown that the policing of this area poses a formidable challenge, one that continues to this day, as law enforcement seeks to alleviate concerns over organised crime, smuggling, trafficking, pillage, and terrorism. Policing the Waterfront: Networks, Partnerships and the Governance of Port Security is the first book of its kind to fully explore the intricacies of how crime is controlled on the waterfront, as well as our understanding of the policing 'partnerships' that exist between state and non-state actors.

Charting the complex configuration of waterfront 'security networks' using a range of analytical techniques, this book presents new empirical data, which exposes and explains the social structures that enable policing partnerships to function when faced with the unique challenges of the waterfront. Particularly striking is the use of enhanced or adjusted theoretical discussions, which may not yet have been applied in a policing or security setting, to both shape and develop previous waterfront security debates, resulting in a work that is both innovative and, yet, still routed in the traditions of empirical research. Overall analysis is achieved through a comparative research design, evaluating the narratives of both state and non-state security providers at the American Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, and the Australian Port of Melbourne; the busiest ports in each country.

Drawing on in-depth interviews undertaken with representatives from the full-array of police agencies, regulatory authorities, port authorities, terminal operators, shipping companies, and maritime unions in each jurisdiction, the author explains why the concept of social capital is important for collaborative crime control - before extending this idea, both conceptually and as a lens through which to make sense of the narratives.” From Publisher’s website.

Popular Punishment: On the Normative Significance of Public Opinion, edited by Jesper Ryberg and Julian V. Roberts. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 272p.

“Should public opinion determine--or even influence--sentencing policy and practice? Should the punishment of criminal offenders reflect what the public regards as appropriate? These deceptively simple questions conceal complex theoretical and methodological challenges to the administration of punishment.

In the West, politicians have often answered these questions in the affirmative; penal reforms have been justified with direct reference to the attitudes of the public. This is why the contention that politicians should bridge the gap between the public and criminal justice practice has widespread resonance. Criminal law scholars, for their part, have often been more reluctant to accept public input in penal practice, and some have even held that the idea of consulting public opinion constitutes a populist approach to punishment.

The purpose of this book is to examine the moral significance of public opinion for penal theory and practice. For the first time in a single volume the editors, Jesper Ryberg and Julian V. Roberts, have assembled a number of respected criminologists, philosphers, and legal theorists to address the various aspects of why and how public opinion should be reflected in the way the criminal justice system deals with criminals. The chapters address the myriad complexities surrounding this issue by first weighing the justifications for incorporating public views into punishment practices and then considering the various ways this might be achieved through juries, prosecutors, restorative justice programs, and other means.” From Publisher’s website.

Preventive Justice, by Andrew Ashworth and Lucia Zedner. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 336p.

“This book arises from a three-year study of Preventive Justice directed by Professor Andrew Ashworth and Professor Lucia Zedner at the University of Oxford. The study seeks to develop an account of the principles and values that should guide and limit the state's use of preventive techniques that involve coercion against the individual.

States today are increasingly using criminal law or criminal law-like tools to try to prevent or reduce the risk of anticipated future harm. Such measures include criminalizing conduct at an early stage in order to allow authorities to intervene; incapacitating suspected future wrongdoers; and imposing extended sentences or indefinate on past wrongdoers on the basis of their predicted future conduct - all in the name of public protection and security.

The chief justification for the state's use of coercion is protecting the public from harm. Although the rationales and justifications of state punishment have been explored extensively, the scope, limits and principles of preventive justice have attracted little doctrinal or conceptual analysis. This book re-assesses the foundations for the range of coercive measures that states now take in the name of prevention and public protection, focusing particularly on coercive measures involving deprivation of liberty. It examines whether these measures are justified, whether they distort the proper boundaries between criminal and civil law, or whether they signal a larger change in the architecture of security. In so doing, it sets out to establish a framework for what we call 'Preventive Justice'.” From Publisher’s website.

Prisoners on Criminology: Convict Life Stories and Crime Prevention, by William S. Tregea. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2014. 396p.

“Drawing on thirty years of prison college courses and volunteer classes in eleven Michigan and California prisons, Prisoners on Criminology: Convict Life Stories and Crime Prevention makes criminology theories come alive through the use of the prisoners’ voices.

The book features policy background and textbook-like chapters that review major criminological theories and present prisoner essays that apply criminology insights to the prisoners’ lives. Each chapter has helpful exercises and discussion and review questions for classroom use.

Introductory informational chapters present an historical review of how the United States came to have the world’s largest prison system. A chapter on prisoners’ educational background presents information from prisoner surveys and the author’s extensive background in postsecondary correctional education. Over eighty prisoner essays show how prisoners connect criminology theories to their lives growing up, with insights on individual, family, and community levels of crime causation.

A chapter on social structure, social process and alternative criminologies is followed by additional information on in-prison criminological issues with several prisoner essays. The conclusion emphasizes the main argument of the book—that the jobless ghetto is a major reason for much of the criminality now in the large correctional apparatus of the United States.

Prisoners on Criminology will be of great value to scholars and students interested in criminology, social deviance, sociology, urban studies, political science, anthropology, counseling, and social work.” From Publisher’s website.

Racialization, Crime, and Criminal Justice in Canada, by Wendy Chan and Dorothy Chunn. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014. 240p.

“Race still matters in Canada, and in the context of crime and criminal justice, it matters a lot. In this book, the authors focus on the ways in which racial minority groups are criminalized, as well as the ways in which the Canadian criminal justice system is racialized. Employing an intersectional analysis, Chan and Chunn explore how the connection between race and crime is further affected by class, gender, and other social relations. The text covers not only conventional topics such as policing, sentencing, and the media, but also neglected areas such as the criminalization of immigration, poverty, and mental illness.” From Publisher’s website.

Responding to Youth Crime in Hong Kong: Penal Elitism, Legitimacy and Citizenship, by Michael Adorjan and Wing Hong Chui. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2013. 206p.

“A society’s response to youth crime reveals much about its broader cultural values, social circumstances, and political affairs. This book examines reactions and policy responses to youth delinquency and crime in Hong Kong during its colonial and post-colonial periods, and in doing so, underscores the history of Hong Kong itself and its present-day circumstances.

Exploring how officials have responded to youth crime in Hong Kong over time, this book tracks the emergence of a penal elitist mode of governance, highlighting concerns not only about young people’s behavior but the need for officials to establish state authority and promote citizen identification. In turn, it reveals an alternative to the ‘usual story’ about youth crime found in many western regions and provides an opportunity to begin to develop a comparative criminology. The book examines the emergence of the ‘disciplinary welfare’ tariff during the 1970s, debates and policy changes related to the minimum age of criminal responsibility and youth sex crimes, and inaction regarding the introduction of restorative justice initiatives in the post-colonial era. It also addresses the power of ‘Post-80s’ youth to protest and challenge government policies, which directly combat contemporary fears regarding the ‘mainlandization’ of Hong Kong.

Drawing on archival sources, official reports and interviews with key stakeholders in the juvenile justice system, Responding to Youth Crime in Hong Kong will appeal to students and scholars interested in Chinese society, criminology, social work, sociology and youth studies.” From Publisher’s website.

A Restorative Approach to Family Violence: Changing Tack, edited by Anne Hayden, Loraine Gelsthorpe, Venezia Kingi and Allison Morris. Farnham, Surrey, UK; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2014. 268p.
“This volume provides an essential update on current thinking, practice and research into the use of restorative justice in the area of family violence. It contains contemporary empirical, theoretical and practical perspectives on the use of restorative justice for intimate partner and family violence, including sexual violence and elder abuse. Whilst raising issues relating to the implications of reporting, it provides a fresh look at victims’ issues as well as providing accounts of those who have participated in restorative justice processes and who have been victims of abusive relationships.

Contributions are included from a wide range of perspectives to provide a balanced approach that is not simply polemic or advocating. Rather, the book genuinely raises the issue for debate, with the advantage of bringing into the open new research which has not been widely published previously. Given its unique experience in the development of restorative justice, the book includes empirical studies relating to New Zealand, contextualized within the global situation by the inclusion of perspectives on practices in the UK, Australia and North America.

This book will be key reading for people who work with violent offending of a family nature as well as for those who are interested in the study of family violence.” From Publisher’s website.

Situational Prevention of Poaching, edited by AM Lemieux. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2013. 232p.

“For centuries, criminologists have looked for scientific ways to study, understand, and ultimately prevent crime. In this volume, a unique offense, poaching, is explored in various contexts to determine what opportunity structures favor this crime and how situational crime prevention may reduce its prevalence. The data sources used range from publically available secondary data about animal populations, to interviews with hunters, to actual law enforcement data collected inside protected areas. Various methods are utilized to look for patterns in poaching behaviour regarding where poachers strike, which species they target and their modus operandi.

Collectively, the volume shows that principles of criminal opportunity theory and situational crime prevention are useful for studying and preventing poaching in a variety of contexts. The methods employed by each chapter are easily replicated and meant to stimulate empirical poaching research where data is available. While the theoretical grounding of this volume is drawn from criminology, it is written for a broad audience of academics, practitioners and those interested in wildlife conservation.” From Publisher’s website.

State Crime and Resistance, edited by Elizabeth Stanley and Jude McCulloch. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2012. 242p.

“Within criminology ‘the state’ is often ignored as an active participant, or represented as a neutral force. While state crime studies have proliferated, criminologists have not paid attention to the history and impact of resistance to state crime. This book recognises that crimes of the state are far more serious and harmful than crimes committed by individuals, and considers how such crimes may be contested, prevented, challenged or stopped.
Gathering together key scholars from the UK, USA, Asia, Australia and New Zealand, this book offers a deepened understanding of state crime through the practical and analytical lens of resistance. This book focuses on crimes ranging from gross violations of human rights (such as genocide, war crimes, mass killings, summary executions, torture, harsh detention and rape during war), to entrenched discrimination, unjust social policies, border controls, corruption, fraud, resource plunder and the failure to provide the regulatory environment and principled leadership necessary to deal with global warming.

As the first to focus on state crime and resistance, this collection inspires new questions as it maps the contours of previously unexplored territory. It is aimed at students and academics researching state crimes, resistance, human rights and social movements. It is also essential reading for all those interested in joining the struggles to champion ways of living that value humanity and justice over power.” From Publisher’s website.

Strange Neighbors: The Role of States in Immigration Policy, edited by Carissa Byrne Hessick and Gabriel J. Chin. New York: New York University Press, 2014. 276p.

“Since its founding, the U.S. has struggled with issues of federalism and states’ rights. In almost every area of law, from abortion to zoning, conflicts arise between the states and the federal government over which entity is best suited to create and enforce laws. In the last decade, immigration has been on the front lines of this debate, with states such as Arizona taking an extremely assertive role in policing immigrants within their borders. While Arizona and its notorious SB 1070 is the most visible example of states claiming expanded responsibility to make and enforce immigration law, it is far from alone. An ordinance in Hazelton, Pennsylvania prohibited landlords from renting to the undocumented. Several states have introduced legislation to deny citizenship to babies who are born to parents who are in the United States without authorization. Other states have also enacted legislation aimed at driving out unauthorized migrants.

Strange Neighbors explores the complicated and complicating role of the states in immigration policy and enforcement, including voices from both sides of the debate. While many contributors point to the dangers inherent in state regulation of immigration policy, at least two support it, while others offer empirically-based examinations of state efforts to regulate immigration within their borders, pointing to wide, state-by-state disparities in locally-administered immigration policies and laws. Ultimately, the book offers an extremely timely, thorough, and spirited discussion on an issue that will continue to dominate state and federal legislatures for years to come.” From Publisher’s website.

The Street Casino: Survival in Violent Street Gangs, by Simon Harding. Chicago; Clifton, UK: Policy Press, 2014. 224p.

“Gang violence is on the increase in certain neighbourhoods. There is an urgent need for a fresh perspective that offers insight into gang structure, organisation and offending behaviour to explain this increase. Using the findings from an extensive ethnographic study of local residents, professionals and gang members in south London, and drawing on his vast experience and knowledge of the field, Simon Harding proposes a unique theoretical perspective on survival in violent street gangs. He applies Bourdieu’s principles of social field analysis and habitus to gangs, establishing them as a social arena of competition where actors struggle for distinction and survival, striving to become ‘players in the game’ in the ‘casino of life’. Success is determined by accruing and retaining playing chips – street capital. Harding’s dramatic and compelling insights depict gang life as one of constant flux, where players jostle for position, reputation, status and distinction. This perspective offers new evidence to the field that will help academics, students, practitioners and policy makers to understand the dynamics of gang behaviour and the associated risks of violence and offending. Simon Harding is currently a senior lecturer in criminology at Middlesex University, UK. He draws on 25 years of experience in research, public policy and project delivery as a crime reduction and community safety practitioner.” From Publisher’s website.

Surviving Incarceration: Inside Canadian Prisons, by Rose Ricciardelli. Waterloo, ONT: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2014. 245p.

“Is prison a humane form of punishment and an effective means of rehabilitation? Are current prison policies, such as shifting resources away from rehabilitation toward housing more offenders, improving the safety and lives of incarcerated populations?

Considering that many Canadians have served time, are currently incarcerated, or may one day be incarcerated—and will be released back into society—it is essential for the functioning and betterment of communities that we understand the realities that shape the prison experience for adult male offenders. Surviving Incarceration reveals the unnecessary and omnipresent violence in prisons, the heterogeneity of the prisoner population, and the realities that different prisoners navigate in order to survive.

Ricciardelli draws on interviews with almost sixty former federal prisoners to show how their criminal convictions, masculinity, and sexuality determined their social status in prison and, in consequence, their potential for victimization. The book outlines the modern “inmate code” that governs prisoner behaviours, the formal controls put forth by the administration, the dynamics that shape sex-offender experiences of incarceration, and the personal growth experiences of many prisoners as they cope with incarceration.” From Publisher’s website.

Survivors of Slavery: Modern-Day Slave Narratives, by Laura T. Murphy. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014. 344p.

“Slavery is not a crime confined to the far reaches of history. It is an injustice that continues to entrap twenty-seven million people across the globe. Laura Murphy offers close to forty survivor narratives from Cambodia, Ghana, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Russia, Thailand, Ukraine, and the United States, detailing the horrors of a system that forces people to work without pay and against their will, under the threat of violence, with little or no means of escape. Representing a variety of circumstances in diverse contexts, these survivors are the Frederick Douglasses, Sojourner Truths, and Olaudah Equianos of our time, testifying to the widespread existence of a human rights tragedy and the urgent need to address it.

Through storytelling and firsthand testimony, this anthology shapes a twenty-first-century narrative that many believe died with the end of slavery in the Americas. Organized around such issues as the need for work, the punishment of defiance, and the move toward activism, the collection isolates the causes, mechanisms, and responses to slavery that allow the phenomenon to endure. Enhancing scholarship in women’s studies, sociology, criminology, law, social work, and literary studies, the text establishes a common trajectory of vulnerability, enslavement, captivity, escape, and recovery, creating an invaluable resource for activists, scholars, legislators, and service providers.” From Publisher’s website.

Traces of Terror: Counter-Terrorism Law, Policing, and Race, by Victoria Sentas. Oxford, UK: New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. 376p.

“Based on field work in Australia undertaken between 2007 and 2009, Traces of Terror: Counter-Terrorism Law, Policing and Race utilises access to the Victoria Police and the Australian Intelligence Security Organisation (ASIO) and assesses their policy impact on Muslim, Somali, Turkish Kurds and Sri Lankan Tamil communities. Drawing on in-depth interviews, participant observations, and legal and policy analysis, the author examines the criminalization and racialization of preparatory offences and 'terrorist organizations', as well as the police and judicial application of contentious concepts, including extremism, radicalization and counter-radicalization. There is thorough analysis of the management of difference, identity and belonging through community policing and social policy, and treatment of expanding police and intelligence powers enacted as a response to combatting terror. Above all, this book traces the persistence of race, racialization and racism in practices presented, on the surface, as 'race neutral' and consensual. From raids and prosecutions, to informal questioning and communitarian forms of regulation, it demonstrates the enduring and shifting meanings of these concepts as practices and their lived, often contradictory effects on the populations who experience them.

Evaluating both those who police and those who are policed, Traces of Terror is not a study of police racism nor of experiences of discrimination, but rather an explanation of the enduring organisation of racial power reflected in, and produced by, counter-terrorism.” From Publisher’s website.

Transforming Criminal Justice? Problem-Solving and Court Specialisation, by Jane Donoghue. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 168p.

“Why is punishment not more effective? Why do we have such high re-offending rates? How can we deal with crime and criminals in a more cost-effective way? Over the last decade in particular, the United Kingdom, in common with other jurisdictions such as Canada, the United States (US) and Australia, has sought to develop more effective ways of responding to criminal behaviour through court reforms designed to address specific manifestations of crime. Strongly influenced by developments in US court specialisation, problem-solving and specialist courts - including domestic violence courts, drugs courts, community courts and mental health courts - have proliferated in Britain over the last few years. These courts operate at the intersection of criminal law and social policy and appear to challenge much of the traditional model of court practice. In addition, policy makers and practitioners have made significant attempts to try to embed problem-solving approaches into the criminal justice system more widely.

Through examination of original data gathered from detailed interviews with judges, magistrates and other key criminal justice professionals in England and Wales, as well as analysis of legislative and policy interventions, this book discusses the impact of the creation and development of court specialisation and problem-solving justice.

This book will be essential reading for students and academics in the fields of criminology, criminal justice, criminal law, socio-legal studies and sociology, as well as for criminal justice practitioners and policy-makers.” From Publisher’s website.

Unruly Women: Performance, Penitence, and Punishment in Early Modern Spain, by Margaret E. Boyle. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014. 184p.

“In the first in-depth study of the interconnected relationships among public theatre, custodial institutions, and women in early modern Spain, Margaret E. Boyle explores the contradictory practices of rehabilitation enacted by women both on and off stage. Pairing historical narratives and archival records with canonical and non-canonical theatrical representations of women’s deviance and rehabilitation, Unruly Women argues that women’s performances of penitence and punishment should be considered a significant factor in early modern Spanish life.

Boyle considers both real-life sites of rehabilitation for women in seventeenth-century Madrid, including a jail and a magdalen house, and women onstage, where she identifies three distinct representations of female deviance: the widow, the vixen, and the murderess. Unruly Women explores these archetypal figures in order to demonstrate the ways a variety of playwrights comment on women’s non-normative relationships to the topics of marriage, sex, and violence.” From Publisher’s website.

Violence Against Women in Kentucky: A History of U.S. and State Legislative Reform, by Carol E. Jordan. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky, 2014. 480p.

“For more than two centuries, Kentucky women have fought for the right to vote, own property, control their wages, and be safe at home and in the workplace. Tragically, many of these women’s voices have been silenced by abuse and violence. In Violence against Women in Kentucky: A History of U.S. and State Legislative Reform, Carol E. Jordan chronicles the stories of those who have led the legislative fight for the last four decades to protect women from domestic violence, rape, stalking, and related crimes.

The story of Kentucky’s legislative reforms is a history of substantial toil, optimism, advocacy, and personal sacrifice by those who proposed the change. This compelling narrative illustrates, through their own points of view, the stories of survivors who serve as inspiration for change. Jordan analyzes national legislative reforms as well as the strategies that have been used to enact and enforce legislation addressing rape and domestic violence at a local level.

Violence against Women in Kentucky is the first book to look at the history of domestic violence and rape in a state that consistently falls at the bottom of women’s rights rankings, as told by the activists and survivors who fought for change. Detailing the successes and failures of reforms and outlining the work that is still to be done, this volume reflects on the future of women’s rights legislation in Kentucky.” From Publisher’s website.

Volatile Social Movements and the Origins of Terrorism: The Radicalization of Change, by Christine Sixta Rinehart. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2014. 166p.

“Although many scholars have studied terrorism, few scholars have ever studied terrorism from the aspect of its initial origins in social movements. Not only is research concerning this phenomenon outdated, but there has also been no consensus as to what causes terrorism. Many contemporary terrorist organizations were once social movements that formed for a specific purpose using nonviolent tactics to accomplish their agenda. Eventually, terrorist tactics became the method of choice for these once peaceful social movements.

Volatile Social Movements and the Origins of Terrorism: The Radicalization of Change, by Christine Sixta Rinehart, focuses on why this transition occurred; why did a peaceful social movement transition to a terrorist organization? The case studies in this book include the Muslim Brotherhood, the ETA, the FARC, and the LTTE. The study focuses on the individual characteristics, group dynamics, and external forces that caused social movements to use terrorist tactics. It is ascertained who made the decision to use terrorism, and why and how that person or group of people ascended to a leadership position within the social movement. After the (person) people, time, and place are found pertaining to the first decision to use terrorism, Sixta Rinehart examines why terrorism became an attractive option for each social movement. Volatile Social Movements and the Origins of Terrorism asks a necessary question for scholars and researchers in counterterrorism and international policy: Under what conditions do social movements resort to the use of terrorist tactics?” From Publisher’s website.

Women, Crime and Criminal Justice: A Global Enquiry, by Rosemary Barberet. Abingdon, UK; New York: Routledge, 2014. 232p.

“This is the first fully internationalized book to focus on women as offenders, victims and justice professionals. It provides background, as well as specialized information that allows readers to comprehend the global forces that shape women and crime; analyze different types of violence against women (in peacetime and in armed conflict); and grasp the challenges faced by women in justice professions such as the police, the judiciary and international peacekeeping.

Provocative, highly topical, engaging and written by an expert in the field, this book examines the role of women in crime and criminal justice internationally. Topics covered include:

  • the role of globalization and development in patterns of female offending and victimization,
  • how a human rights framework can help explain women´s crime, victimization and the criminal justice response,
  • global women’s activism,
  • international perspectives on violence against women, including femicide, violence in conflict and post conflict settings, sex work and sex trafficking,
  • women’s access to justice, as well as the increased role of women in international criminal justice settings.

This book will be essential reading for those involved in the study of development, human rights, governance, security sector reform, international relations and public health, as debates about these subjects are intrinsically linked to the issues surrounding women, crime and justice. It will also be useful for students taking courses on gender, crime and criminal justice, violence against women, international criminal justice and gender studies.” From Publisher’s website.

The Wrong Carlos: Anatomy of a Wrongful Execution, by James S. Liebman and the Columbia DeLuna Project. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014. 448p.

“In 1989, Texas executed Carlos DeLuna, a poor Hispanic man with childlike intelligence, for the murder of Wanda Lopez, a convenience store clerk. His execution passed unnoticed for years until a team of Columbia Law School faculty and students almost accidentally chose to investigate his case and found that DeLuna almost certainly was innocent. They discovered that no one had cared enough about either the defendant or the victim to make sure the real perpetrator was found. Everything that could go wrong in a criminal case did. This book documents DeLuna’s conviction, which was based on a single, nighttime, cross-ethnic eyewitness identification with no corroborating forensic evidence. At his trial, DeLuna’s defense, that another man named Carlos had committed the crime, was not taken seriously. The lead prosecutor told the jury that the other Carlos, Carlos Hernandez, was a “phantom” of DeLuna’s imagination. In upholding the death penalty on appeal, both the state and federal courts concluded the same thing: Carlos Hernandez did not exist.

The evidence the Columbia team uncovered reveals that Hernandez not only existed but was well known to the police and prosecutors. He had a long history of violent crimes similar to the one for which DeLuna was executed. Families of both Carloses mistook photos of each for the other, and Hernandez’s violence continued after DeLuna was put to death. This book and its website (thewrongcarlos.net) reproduce law-enforcement, crime lab, lawyer, court, social service, media, and witness records, as well as court transcripts, photographs, radio traffic, and audio and videotaped interviews, documenting one of the most comprehensive investigations into a criminal case in U.S. history.

The result is eye-opening yet may not be unusual. Faulty eyewitness testimony, shoddy legal representation, and prosecutorial misfeasance continue to put innocent people at risk of execution. The principal investigators conclude with novel suggestions for improving accuracy among the police, prosecutors, forensic scientists, and judges.” From Publisher’s website.

Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling: The Function of Avowal in Justice, by Michel Foucault, edited by Fabienne Brion and Bernard E. Harcourt, translated by Stephen W. Sawyer. Chicago: University of Chicago Press; Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium: Presses Universitaires de Louvain, 2014. 349p.

“Three years before his death, Michel Foucault delivered a series of lectures at the Catholic University of Louvain that until recently remained almost unknown. These lectures—which focus on the role of avowal, or confession, in the determination of truth and justice—provide the missing link between Foucault’s early work on madness, delinquency, and sexuality and his later explorations of subjectivity in Greek and Roman antiquity.

Ranging broadly from Homer to the twentieth century, Foucault traces the early use of truth-telling in ancient Greece and follows it through to practices of self-examination in monastic times. By the nineteenth century, the avowal of wrongdoing was no longer sufficient to satisfy the call for justice; there remained the question of who the “criminal” was and what formative factors contributed to his wrong-doing. The call for psychiatric expertise marked the birth of the discipline of psychiatry in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as its widespread recognition as the foundation of criminology and modern criminal justice.

Published here for the first time, the 1981 lectures have been superbly translated by Stephen W. Sawyer and expertly edited and extensively annotated by Fabienne Brion and Bernard E. Harcourt. They are accompanied by two contemporaneous interviews with Foucault in which he elaborates on a number of the key themes. An essential companion to Discipline and Punish, Wrong-Doing, Truth-Telling will take its place as one of the most significant works of Foucault to appear in decades, and will be necessary reading for all those interested in his thought.” From Publisher’s website.

 

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