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Suspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Racial ProfilingSuspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Racial Profiling
Author: Jack Glaser
Publisher: New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. 280p.
Reviewers: Joe Feagin | January 2016

Suspect Race: Causes and Consequences of Racial Profiling by Jack Glaser, deals with the controversial and sensitive topic of racial profiling. Our reviewer, Joe Feagin, praises Glaser for offering a good review of contemporary studies of racial inequalities in U.S. policing, and of the relevant psychological literature on stereotyping, prejudice, and implicit bias, among other strengths of the book.  At the same time, Feagin criticizes the book for being weak on “certain broader societal context issues, and for neglecting “the central and problematical role of powerful whites, especially elite white men” in pushing racial profiling.

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Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel: The Gangster, the Flamingo, and the Making of Modern Las Vegas Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel: The Gangster, the Flamingo, and the Making of Modern Las Vegas
Author: Larry D. Gragg
Publisher: Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger, 2015. 200p.
Reviewer: Jay Albanese | January 2016

Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel was the quintessential gangster of the mob era of the 1930s and 40s.  Siegel was one of those mobsters who, along with Lucky Luciano and Meyer Lansky and some others, came to personify the American mafia for generations.  Larry Gragg takes a historian’s look back at this era in Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel: The Gangster, the Flamingo, and the Making of Modern Las Vegas.  Jay Albanese says of the book: “Even those knowledgeable about organized crime in the early 20th century will learn new facts in this highly readable treatment of Siegel's life and times in New York, Los Angeles, and Las Vegas.

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Caught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American PoliticsCaught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics
Author: Marie Gottschalk
Publisher:  Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015. 474p.
Reviewer: Robert C. Hauhart | January, 2016

Criminal justice issues generally and mass incarceration specifically have received considerable attention from a variety of sources in recent years.   Marie Gottschalk’s latest book, Caught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics, weighs into the debate and discussion of the latter issue.  Our reviewer Robert Hauhart calls this “a masterful work of scholarship and a comprehensive critique of the contemporary American criminal justice system.”  But, concludes Hauhart, Gottschalk fails in her attempt to develop a political analysis that would enable the deconstruction of the so-called carceral state. 

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Violence All AroundViolence All Around
Author: John Sifton
Publisher: Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015. 336p.
Reviewer: Jared Del Rosso | January 2016

In his review of John Sifton’s Violence All Around, Jared Del Rosso says that “violence may be all around us, but it goes on behind our backs, at the periphery of our fields of vision and, for that matter, attention. We usually encounter it,” he says, “only second-hand—as media spectacle cleansed of politics or in political discourse cleansed of brutality.”  Sifton’s perspective is broad and far reaching – delving, for example, into the use of drones and torture, and even into what he calls the violence of non-violence.  Del Rosso calls the book a provocation to force the reader to think about “the capacity of some humans to plan, wield, and subsequently obscure violence.” 

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